Monday, 22 March 2010

Arthropodiums


Arthropodium milleflorum
Arthropodium milleflorum
A very pretty and understated plant found growing among the grasses and other herbs under Eucalypts over large parts of south-eastern Australia, where it is very adaptable.
In the UK it will be less adaptable (shade in England is not like shade in New South Wales) but given a well drained soil and sun or light shade it is quite hardy and the delicate mauve flowers on tall, slender arching stems (to 3ft high) give a fresh, light effect in the border. These will have frozen in their pots in the poly tunnel this last winter and all have survived.
Arthropodium milleflorum
Update: these came through the very wet winter of 2013-14 on heavy Wealden clay, so look like being very tough indeed. Not tried them with wet and cold yet.
1L pot ~ £6





Arthropodium candidum maculatum
Arthropodium candidum maculatum
A more familiar plant in European gardens, this is a tiny New Zealand version of the above. The overall effect is of a small grassy tuft with tiny white flowers on short thread-like stems. The foliage though, as with so many New Zealanders, is the real feature, being a rather cryptic mottled coffee brown.
Intriguingly pretty, but grow it in a trough or raised bed or you'll forget it's there.
sold out


Dichopogon strictus
Dichopogon strictus
Closely related to milleflorum but with larger, more deeply coloured flowers. I've not tried it unprotected in the open garden yet but this is another common and widespread species in eastern Australia so worth a try in a sunny well-drained spot outside. The locals call it the Chocolate Lily. I'm not sure why. It doesn't seem to be scented.
sold out

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