Thursday, 4 July 2019

Mirabilis longiflora

Mirabilis longiflora
A glorious night-scented species - the fragrance redolent of tropical evenings. (The very long-tubed white flowers are typical of plants pollinated by moths.) A low spreading perennial with rather sticky green foliage.
xeric bed
Very vigorous and easy on the dry chalky raised bed at the nursery, and has established (presumably from stray seeds) in the herbaceous border at the nursery as well. In colder, wetter climates it  would also be fabulous in a big terracotta pot on the patio, right next to where you sit of an evening with your prosecco and BBQ
£8



Centaurea atropurpurea

Centaurea atropurpurea
An easy and long lived medium sized border perennial but not garish or coarse. Ragged tufts of deep wine red flowers emerge from hard sculpted involucres of dark overlapping scales.
Centaurea atropurpurea
The leaves are jaggedly cut with narrow lobes, and the whole plant is edged with silver rime. Suitable for any reasonably well-drained soil in sun.
£8



Iochroma australe

Acnistus australis dark purple
A vigorous and tough South American shrub with nodding funnel shaped flowers in various shades of purple and also white.
Acnistus australis pale purple
Seems remarkably hardy in many parts of the UK, given a sheltered sunny situation and can make a very big vigorous shrub against a warm wall. Hard pruning after flowering is recommended.
Acnistus australis white
This has had quite a few scientific names including Acnistus and Dunalia.
Please let me know which colour you'd like
£15



Sandersonia aurantiaca

Sandersonia aurantiaca
An exquisite diminutive relative of Gloriosa with delicate orange or yellow lantern-shaped flowers in summer on slender semi-climbing stems.
Sandersonia aurantiaca
From southern Africa, this is very nearly hardy given a dry winter and a warm sheltered spot. Otherwise an easy pot plant for a frost-free greenhouse.
£10



Bomarea edulis

Bomarea edulis
A fabulous species - basically a climbing Alstroemeria with umbels of bell-shaped flowers on and off through the summer until the frost. In autumn, the green fruits split to reveal bright orange seeds.
Bomarea edulis
Possibly the hardiest Bomarea – the parent plant has gone from strength to strength completely unprotected in our semi shady woodsy raised bed, climbing through a dwarf Prunus. A stunning herbaceous climber to about 6ft.
£10



Wednesday, 3 July 2019

More Euonymus


Euonymus occidentalis
Euonymus occidentalis
A modestly sized species with rich red/maroon flowers and good quality deciduous foliage. The fruits are pink capsules with orange seeds.
Euonymus occidentalis
I've been very impressed with the quality of this American species - perfect for mixed woodland plantings.
£16



Euonymus obovatus
Euonymus obovatus
Another North American species - this time a low and creeping, with pale greenish pink flowers followed by pink warty capsules opening to reveal orange seeds
£10



Euonymus clivicola rongchuensis HIRD 103
Euonymus clivicola rongchuensis and Akebia longeracemosa
A very slender graceful evergreen Asian species related to cornutus with delicate brownish flowers giving way to strange narrow lobed fruits holding the usual orange seeds.
Euonymus clivicola rongchuensis
An easy and fairly vigorous woodland species
£15



Dracocephalum austriacum

Dracocephalum austriacum
This bushy species has narrow green foliage and heads of large dark inky purple flowers. You can see where the common name 'Dragonhead' comes from.
Dracocephalum austriacum and Iris aphylla
Endangered in the wild but easy in the garden as long as the roots don't get hot and dry (ie. an alpine, rather than a Mediterranean plant). Very special.
£8




Lindelofia anchusoides

Lindelofia anchusoides
Or L.longiflora - the naming of this plant seems very confused. Anyway, an unaccountably little grown Cynoglossum-like plant with intense azure flowers over dense clumps of leaves. Not at all coarse
Lindelofia longiflora
Hardy and easy in a sunny well-drained place
£8




Tuesday, 18 June 2019

Spiraea hayatana

Spiraea hayatana
A pleasing medium-sized species with strongly red tinged new growth and heads of white flowers tinged pink at the centre in June.
Spiraea hayatana
Like most Spiraea it is easy and hardy.
£12



Wednesday, 27 March 2019

Delphinium variegatum

Delphinium variegatum
I have a small batch of these ready to go on the nursery. Intense violet blue flowers on branching hoary pale stems. The foliage is rather good.
Delphinium variegatum
Like other West Coast Delphiniums, this is unlikely to do well under ordinary garden conditions but if you're good with Californian or South African bulbs there's no reason why this shouldn't do well for you.
Delphinium variegatum
A well drained soil in full sun is probably right - drier in summer, moister in winter. Here they've grown well in the tunnel with no special care.
I won't be sending these out in flower - way too tall and brittle
£8



Jeffersonia dubia

Jeffersonia dubia
A classic woodlander from Japan of exquisite poise and hue and one of the first plants I fell in love with. The crystalline purple flowers appear in early spring above the coppery red emerging foliage. The leaves are made up of two leaflets and are a soft matt green. Just beautiful.
When I got the seeds I'd assumed they'd not do well here - too hot and dry in summer, but they've grown easily with almost no extra care. Best on a moist soil in shade with other small woodland plants
£6



Sunday, 24 March 2019

Ercilla volubilis

Ercilla volubilis
An unusual Chilean climber related to Phytolacca with small wavy matt evergreen leaves, and clusters of pink scented fluffy inflorescences in spring. Can be trained on a sunny wall or growing through a large shrub or as ground cover.
Ercilla volubilis
Hardy and adaptable with a bit of shelter
£16




Tuesday, 12 March 2019

Codonopsis

Rather like a climbing Fritillaria is how I'd describe these unusual herbaceous vines. The flowers have the same bell-shape and a similar green and maroon colour scheme, though without the chequering. The markings are just as interesting however.
Often recommended for woodland conditions but adaptable to a variety of rich and not too dry soils where the vine can grow up through shrubs into the light. Watch out for molluscs early on. To 6ft tall. Flowering late summer/autumn.

Codonopsis viridis ex CC 7454
Codonopsis viridis CC 7650
An exquisitely marked species - highly desirable
£8




Codonopsis lanceolata
Codonopsis lanceolata in Schefflera taiwaniana
A particularly tough easy species with substantial jade and maroon bells
Codonopsis lanceolata and Tropaeolum speciosum in Schefflera taiwaniana
£8




Codonopsis ussuriensis

Codonopsis ussuriensis
Like lanceolata but with smaller, maroon bells. Also very hardy and easy
£8



Codonopsis rotundifolia grandiflora
Not flowered yet
£8




Codonopsis subscaposa
Codonopsis subscaposa
A stunning non-climbing species. The nodding Fritillaria-like flowers are creamy but heavily veined in black and held on incredibly tall slender stems over a small cluster of leaves (and yet no staking required so far).
Codonopsis subscaposa
Hugely desirable and my new favourite. Codonopsis seem to do well here despite the hot dry summers, with very little mollusc damage once they're past the seedling stage.
£8