Tuesday, 26 September 2017

Buddleja colvilei large leaf form

Buddleja colvilei large leaf form
B.colvilei is known for its relatively large rich pink bell-shaped flowers - much larger than any other species that I know of. This is a very rare form with large greyish felted leaves up to 20cm long, and is descended from a plant that used to grow against the house at Borde Hill.
Buddleja colvilei
The flowers appear in mid spring on the previous year's growth and can get frosted off in bud, so a very sheltered situation is required in all but the warmest areas.
£18



Teucrium fruticans Azureum

Teucrium fruticans azureum
A strikingly better form of the species than the commonly available one. The flowers are a good strong clear blue and the stems, new shoots and leaf reverses are pure white. An easy but wide-spreading species - not for a small space. Flowering over a very long period from early spring into summer, it can be cut hard and will flower on the new shoots.
Teucrium fruticans Azureum
It is possibly a bit less hardy than the common form but I've found it easy and vigorous in a sunny dry spot, especially against a sunny wall
£12



Abelia (Linnaea) floribunda

Abelia floribunda
A very striking Mexican species with long tubular dusky pink flowers and small rounded evergreen leaves. The lax spreading habit means it might be best treated as a wall shrub, but I rather like it growing through other shrubs.
Abelia floribunda
It does need shelter and warmth to flower well but is otherwise easy.
The sinking of Abelia (and also Dipelta and Kolkwitzia) into Linnaea has upset a few people but it does actually make sense if you understand the science.
£15






Vicia gigantea

Vicia gigantea
This is a good pink form of a Californian native vetch. In the wild a potentially vigorous coloniser but here I've found it no more so than some of the popular climbing Lathyrus such as L.latifolius, and it makes a very nice change from that with its fresh green pinnate foliage and spikes of rich pink flowers.
Vicia gigantea
Even so I'd give it plenty of space somewhere it won't swamp small treasures. Spring flowering - cut it back to the ground after flowering for fresh new growth.
£8



Crithmum maritimum

Crithmum maritimum
A native umbellifer which has always impressed me with its compact semi-succulent almost sub-shrubby growth habit, attractively cut foliage and short pale flower stems. The creamy green flowers contrast nicely with the waxy jade green foliage.
A common shingle beach plant here in Sussex (the seeds were collected from plants at Lancing) alongside sea kale and yellow horned poppies but it grows happily in a well drained sunny site inland. The plant can apparently be used as a vegetable (known as rock samphire) and has a strong but not unpleasant flavour.
£8



Phlomis 'angustifolia' Toob

Phlomis angustifolia
A very striking Phlomis with the edges of the grey leaves turned up to reveal the white undersides, giving a very smart two-tone effect, especially in winter. The flowers are a clear bright yellow.
This has proved hardy and easy in a sunny well-drained spot.
Phlomis angustifolia
Originally obtained as P.angustifolia, it seems this name is a synonym of P.fruticosa. It's not clear if it's a form of fruticosa or another species but it's a much nicer plant. Nick Macer gave it the varietal name 'Toob' because of the 'toobular' shape of the leaves.
£8



Some old favourites for Autumn

These herbaceous perennials like moist soils in sun or part shade and are fully hardy. None are invasive and all add a pleasing seasonal touch to the late summer and autumn garden, flowering until frosted.

Plectranthus excisus
Plectranthus excisus
A succession of violet labiate flowers in long slanting racemes in late summer and autumn - really glows in the autumn light. The foliage is unusual in shape and takes on dark tints as the season progresses. Best in semi shade and not too dry and the stems are brittle so avoid exposed sites. Late to emerge in spring.
£8



Persicaria sp. Indian Summer
Persicaria sp. Indian Summer
A popular species lately with rich pink flowers and red tinged heart-shaped foliage. A lovely contribution to the late garden scene. Not even slightly invasive, with a compact root system
£8



Boehmeria tricuspis
Boehmeria tricuspis
Sometimes labelled B.tricuspida, a subtly lovely (non-stinging) nettle relative adding mellow autumnal colours to the border or woodland garden. Lush jaggedly cut leaves, pale catkins and red stems.
£8



Chelonopsis moschatus
Chelonopsis moschata
Tubular pink flowers more like a Penstemon (some of which used to be classified as Chelone - hence the name) and foliage that reminds me a bit of a Hydrangea. This is a rhizomatous perennial, spreading steadily but not in a bad way. Usually grown as a woodlander (where it is admirable) but adaptable, and flowering over a long period into autumn.
£8