Monday, 26 March 2012

More Lathyrus

Lathyrus aureus
Lathyrus aureus
Reminiscent of L.vernus in that it doesn’t climb but bigger and producing flowers of an unusual soft orange colour. For any good soil but especially nice in light woodland.
2L pots ~ £6





Lathyrus davidii
Lathyrus davidii
Another orange-ish flowered species but quite different to aureus with a more robust upright, almost climbing habit and oddly coloured flowers beginning yellowish green. 
Lathyrus davidii?
Also good in woodland conditions but very adaptable.
2L pots ~ £6





Lathyrus sulphureus
Lathyrus sulphureus
From California – this is one of those peculiar Lathyrus that has tendrils and seems to want to climb but never quite gets it together. The flowers remind me of L.davidii, starting out pale yellowish green and ending up orange. Very pretty, in a quiet way, and easy.
sold out



Sunday, 25 March 2012

...and some more

Ellisiophyllum pinnatum
Ellisiophyllum pinnatum
A handy woodland creeper related to Mazus apparently. Pure white flowers appear in summer from a mat of lobed leaves. Easy in shady conditions, especially where a bit damp, and ideal for clothing rocks near water features for example. 
field grown ~ £5





Epimedium leptorrhizum
Epimedium leptorrhizum & Adoxa moschatellina
Forming a dense, slow- spreading clump close to the ground. This species produces relatively large soft pink flowers just above the foliage. The brownish new growth is a feature too. Totally hardy in a moist woodsy spot.
1L pots ~ £7




Epimedium platypetalum
Epimedium platypetalum

One of a small number of Chinese species lacking the usual spurs. (The only others that I am aware of are ecalcaratum and campanulatum) In this case the flowers are bright yellow bells and the new foliage is coppery. A neat species that spreads slowly to form a dense colony. For moist woodland conditions.
 1L pots ~ £7





Delphinium carolinianum
Delphinium carolinianum
A graceful and slender little perennial larkspur from the Mid-Western USA. Rarely offered in the UK, but should be easy to please in a sunny or semi-shaded spot without too much competition.
10cm pots ~ £5



Geum rivale islandicum
Geum rivale islandicum
The miniature Icelandic form of our rather lovely but understated Water Avens. The nodding pale peachy flowers are much the same but on shorter stems. An easy and adaptable 'alpine' on any soil that does not dry out. Ideal mini bog plant.
10cm pots ~ £5





Campanula


Campanula raddeana
Campanula raddeana
A Caucasian species with strongly serrated basal leaves and rich purple bells in reddish calyces on slender  reddish stems. An easy ‘alpine’ for any well drained soil in sun, but like many bell-flowers it is a bit of a runner.
10cm pots ~ £5



Campanula stevenii beauverdiana
Campanula stevenii beauverdiana
A lovely Caucasian species with violet bells over a very long period in summer. An easy alpine for sun and good drainage.
1L pots ~ £5




Saturday, 3 March 2012

Aristolochia

Definitely something of a collectors group these - the peculiar and often cryptic flowers might need a magnifying glass to really appreciate but if the popularity of Arisaema and Asarum is anything to go by, I can see them being very desirable. The genus occurs throughout the northern temperate zone from small herbaceous Mediterranean species to large Asian and American forest climbers (as well as some monstrous tropical vines) and I hope to be able to offer a few more as time goes on.

Aristolochia bianorii
Aristolochia bianorii
A tiny and extremely charming creeping species from the Balearic Islands. The whole plant covers an area of only a few square inches but makes relatively large upstanding 'friar's cowl' type flowers in spring. I've not tried it unprotected yet but Balearic plants can be surprisingly hardy with a bit of shelter.
Aristolochia bianorii
The main problem will be the fact that it is a mainly winter grower, often disappearing completely in summer. That and its minuscule proportions mean it's probably safest in a container or alpine house.
sorry - sold out



Aristolochia serpentaria
Aristolochia serpentaria
Very different - a North American woodland herb looking rather like a bean seedling. The flowers are amazingly inconspicuous but worth hunting for being reddish brown and produced just above the soil surface. Hardly a show stopper, but I like them. Completely new to me here but probably needing cool shady moist conditions to thrive. Survived the slug onslaught unscathed this spring.
10cm pots ~ £8



Aristolochia sempervirens
Aristolochia sempervirens
A terrific miniature evergreen climber, perfect for decorating low shrubs like Brooms, Lavender and Cistus, as it does in its natural habitat. Aristolochia flowers are usually fairly cryptically coloured and more of a curio than a thing of beauty (though I like them a lot), but these are quite striking with a bright golden interior and a reddish brown exterior. The foliage too is very good - small and glossy and evergreen.
Aristolochia sempervirens
These plants have suffered not at all in the last few winters down here in Sussex. Suitable for sun or semi shade and very drought tolerant once established. The plant pictured is growing on almost pure chalk. Ultimately probably capable of reaching several feet in height but hardly rampant.
1L pots ~ £8



Aristolochia baetica
Aristolochia baetica
Possibly the largest and most vigorous or the Mediterranean species with relatively large (3cm) maroon red flowers mostly in spring. Capable of forming quite a substantial vine but not enough to be a nuisance.
Aristolochia baetica
Originally from southern Spain and Portugal, this is hardy on a well drained soil in sun with some shelter from the worst of the weather at least in the southern parts of the UK and points south.
Few 1L pots ~ £7