Tuesday, 3 July 2012

Anemopsis californica


Anemopsis californica
Not to be confused with Anemonopsis – this is a relative of Houttuynia with very striking flowers, somewhat reminiscent of a Magnolia (though actually made up of lots of small flowers, rather than one big one). A colonising plant for shallow water or wet mud and one of the few garden plants that should be happy in a salt marsh. Fully hardy, but grow as warm as possible in full sun for best results.
1.5L pots ~ £7








Akebia longeracemosa

Akebia longeracemosa
An unusual and little-known climber – so far much less rampant than the more common species but with similar fresh green foliage. The dangling inflorescences are very odd, with a few larger maroon female flowers at the top and a string of small male flowers below.
1L pots ~ £7




Umbellifers!

And the same to you mate, I hear you cry!
But no, this family, technically known as the Apiaceae, has maintained a steady following over the last decade or so, despite the relatively subdued colour schemes (usually yellow or white flowers, occasionally pink, or very rarely something brighter.) To the untrained eye they might be a little too reminiscent of weeds (cow parsley, hogweed and ground elder are in the same family) or vegetables (carrots, parsnips and celery likewise) for comfort. Nevertheless the often extravagant foliage and light lacy effect of the flower heads (and the fact that most are certainly not weeds) makes them very desirable to those gardeners who look for more than just big bright colours.

Seseli gummiferum
Seseli gummiferum
As much a foliage plants as for flowers - an extraordinary species with pale grey finely lobed leaves on pale stems, topped with broad heads of pinkish flowers. For sunny freely drained sites, this species is usually monocarpic but easily raised from fresh seed.
Sold out for now, and no seed set this year, but hopefully I'll have more in the future


Silaum silaus
Our native Pepper Saxifrage, this is a fine low growing species with glossy narrow cut leaflets and whitish heads of flowers. Easy in any open sunny site. Perennial.
2L pots ~ £6





Angelica gigas
Angelica gigas
The classic big lush Angelica with big impressive glossy maroon umbels and bracts contrasting well with the fresh green foliage (something I personally prefer to the total darkness of some forms). To 6ft. For moist soils in sun or light shade.
Sold out

Lots more umbellifers to come!

More new plants


Nepeta nervosa
Nepeta nervosa
An unusually choice and delicate Nepeta with finely textured narrow foliage and heads of violet blue flowers all summer. Deserves careful siting away from rougher neighbours. Probably best treated as an alpine.
1L pots ~ £5









Adenophora sp.
Adenophora liliifolia?
Obtained as A.lilifolia, which I'm pretty sure it's not, and being offered by another as A.aurita (said to be from Roy Lancaster no less), the naming of Adenophora in the trade does seem unusually messy. Nevertheless a very pretty upright species of bellflower with conical violet blue bells in summer over a long period. The foliage is not at all coarse and it does not run underground (unlike some). Easy and adaptable.
1L pots ~ £5




Anemone multifida
Anemone multifida
A lovely small species with rounded creamy flowers (some with a purplish shading on the outside) through spring and summer. For a sunny or semi-shady site on any reasonably well-drained soil. This species is often offered as A.palmata, but that is a completely different species.
1L pots ~ £4




Viola elatior
Viola elatior

The Tall Violet - so called because of its upright branching habit. Large rounded white flowers are tinged purple.
Viola elatior
A solid perennial for any decent garden soil in sun or semi shade.
1L pots ~ £5




Salvia jurisicii
Salvia jurisicii
A miniature species of the European Meadow-Clary kind with deeply cut leaves and spikes of violet flowers. Ideal for gravel gardens with other small dry-land herbs.
sold out