Monday, 23 September 2013

Iris gracilipes

Iris gracilipes
Neat grassy tussocks (quite ornamental in themselves) sprout multitudes of small but perfectly formed mauve flowers in June. A terrific little Evansia, related to I.cristata and verna but much much easier to grow and flower.
Iris gracilipes
Seems more than happy so far in well-drained shade but I have the feeling it'll be quite adaptable elsewhere.
Another one of those plants I grow here that I look at and think Why on earth isn't everyone growing this?
10cm pots ~ £6




Gladiolus papilio

Gladiolus papilio
A terrific tall slender species that always attracts attention with its cryptically coloured nodding flowers. Easy and perfectly hardy around here and, though I've not tried it, probably worth trying to naturalise in rough grass. It can run about a bit underground, popping up here and there so I recommend planting it among herbaceous perennials or low shrubs that are done flowering for the year.
10cm pots ~ £5




Commelina robusta

Commelina robusta
A stunning North American species similar in many ways to the popular but tender C.tuberosa, with bigger flowers, and a rather sprawling habit that makes it perfect for growing among plants that need a bit of jazzing up late in the season. Late to emerge (June) but flowers continuously from mid summer until bitten back by the frost.
Commelina robusta
Give it as much sun as possible and a retentive fertile soil, and maybe give it a protective mulch (though I'm not really convinced it needs it).
sold out

Monday, 2 September 2013

Keiskea japonica Pink form

Keiskea japonica pink form
Keiskea are from Japan and make extremely pretty bushy herbaceous perennials to about 2ft tall. The pink is very pale so the flowers shine out against the dark tinted foliag.
Plants that flower late into autumn are always worth having and there are a number of late season Lamiaceae (mint family) from eastern Asia that are far too little grown in the UK. Colquhounia, Elscholzia and Rostrinucula are three that I grow, and this is another.
Keiskea japonica
Adaptable and completely hardy, but possibly at their best in coolish, moistish spots.

1L pots ~ £7




Boehmeria

Vigorous and lush herbaceous perennials of the nettle family

Boehmeria tricuspis
Boehmeria tricuspis
Suggest growing an ornamental nettle to most gardeners and I suspect they'd look at you funny and head off in another direction, but this really is a good one - not stinging, and not at all invasive - just good lush foliage and attractive catkins in late summer.
Boehmeria tricuspis
Thrives best in moistish woodsy conditions but happy anywhere that doesn't dry out too much.
Sold out 

Boehmeria sieboldiana
Boehmeria sieboldiana
Very like a big lush nettle actually, but don't let that put you off - not at all invasive (or stinging) with pale creamy catkins.
Boehmeria sieboldiana
A good summer woodlander for rich moist soils.
1L pots ~ £6