Monday, 28 October 2013

Adenophora takedae

Adenophora takedae
A very pretty little Japanese bellflower; the flowers are relatively large for the size of the plant and held on delicate wiry stems. Fully hardy and late flowering.
For well drained (but not too dry), sunny (but not too hot) situations, with alpines or other small perennials and bulbs.
1L pots ~ £7




Tuesday, 22 October 2013

Digitalis obscura

Digitalis obscura
A very distinct small, almost shrubby species from Spain. Generally hardy in the southern portion of the UK, especially in drier areas but worthy of a special place in a raised bed or container.
Digitalis obscura
Thanks again to Dennis for the seed.
sold out for now

Friday, 11 October 2013

Spiraea thunbergii

Spiraea thunbergii
I get the impression that Spiraea is one of those groups, like Hypericum, that most keen gardeners tend to scoot past, and generally speaking I'd do likewise, but I've come to learn that almost every group has something choice to offer and it can be fun locating it.

Spiraea thunbergii is one such gem - hardly an obscurity (it has an AGM after all) but I hardly ever see it in gardens or nurseries. It is an exquisite shrub combining sprays of pure white flowers with the lightest and freshest of pale green leaves, all in a loose billowing (but not overly large) arching shrub up to about 4ft tall and across. Mine flowers surprisingly early in the year (March) and goes on into May. After that the foliage and form make a very pleasant contrast to darker heavier plants, and are never even slightly ugly.
Can be pruned quite hard after flowering if neccessary and I imagine it would make a good informal hedge.
Very easy to please on any soil in sun. Absolutely spiffing in every way.
3L pots ~ £9




Leucosceptrum stellipilum formosanum

Leucosceptrum stellipilum formosanum
Mauve pink bottle-brushes and large (to 6ins) fresh pale green foliage. A lush leafy herbaceous perennial related to Elscholtzia, Agastache and Rostrinucula, and with the same late flowering season - well into November if the weather allows.
Leucosceptrum stellipilum formosanum
Possibly best in sheltered woodland to avoid hot sun and early frosts which can damage the display. Otherwise easy and adaptable.
3L pots ~ £8




Salvia reptans

Salvia reptans
Very different – this is a slender willowy American, very late f;lowering species with very narrow, almost grassy green leaves, giving a very light fresh effect in the garden among grasses or grey leaved shrubs. The flowers are exquisite – small but of intense cobalt blue on fine stems above the foliage and produced from September until the frosts. For open well-drained sunny sites.
Salvia reptans
Two things: like many bushy Salvias, the stems are quite brittle, and the flowering, being so late can be spoilt by harsh weather, so although quite cold hardy, all in all best given some shelter.

Ps. not to be confused with S.repens which is a low growing S. African species with short spikes of mauvish flowers. I think both reptans and repens mean creeping (as in reptile) but this one, so far at least, does no such thing. Strange...
1L pots ~ £7