Monday, 11 August 2014

Salvia canariensis candidissima

Salvia canariensis
A shrubby Canary Island species related to the Mediterranean and African sages. This is striking for its broad grey foliage and pure white fluffy stems and branching sprays of flowers from mid summer until the frost. Lynsey Pink tells me that forms of canariensis with fluffy white stems should be known as S.c.candidissima. 
Salvia canariensis
This is a plant for dry sunny conditions and is not very hardy but well worth a try in a sheltered spot outside in milder areas. In the wild it is a large shrub but in colder areas it is usually cut to the ground by frost but regenerates strongly if the cold does not penetrate too deeply. Otherwise an excellent container plant kept dry and frost-free.
2L pots ~ £6



Iris unguicularis Peloponnese Snow

Iris unguicularis Peloponnese Snow
I'm very excited to be able to offer this superb new wild form from Greece, given to me by Robert Rolfe a couple of years back. Since then it has proved hardy in a dry raised bed and flowered freely through much of last winter. This is a relatively small form of the species but remarkably vigorous.
Iris unguicularis Peloponnese Snow
The flowers were damaged by the heavy persistent rain and slugs this last mild wet winter and for that reason alone I might recommend alpine house or frame cultivation. In normal years they might well perform perfectly well in a sheltered spot in a south or east facing bed.
3in pots ~ £8




Ozothamnus ledifolius

Ozothamnus ledifolius
A very lovely Tasmanian alpine subshrub with dense small glossy green foliage, bright yellow on the underside, and the flowers are clusters of creamy everlasting daisies that open from orange buds.
Saxifraga Foundling & Ozothamnus ledifolius
The whole effect is very lovely. On top of this, unlike many subshrubs, this species is very cold hardy and grows well in cold wet conditions.
Ozothamnus ledifolius
1L pots ~ £6



Pycnanthemum - the Mountain Mints

A little-grown genus in the UK - this group of North American mints are wonderfully aromatic (of peppermint) and worth growing for that alone but some are very attractive in flower too.

Pycnanthemum muticum
Pycnanthemum muticum

P.muticum has the great bonus of pearly white, almost Euphorbia-like bracts around the flower heads which gives the whole plant a pale ghostly effect, especially if grown in moist semi shaded conditions.
Pycnanthemum muticum
P.muticum is said to run vigorously but I have not found them invasive. Very adaptable and hardy but seem best in moist fertile soils in semi shade.
sold out - more later in the summer

Pycnanthemum tenuifolium
Pycnanthemum cf. tenuifolium
Upright plants with narrow peppermint scented foliage and pale flowers. Adaptable, pretty and not at all invasive.
2L pots - £5