Thursday, 29 October 2020

Clematis socialis

Clematis socialis
A gorgeous small species of non-climbing herbaceous and somewhat suckering habit - popping up here and there around the original plant, but without being in any way a nuisance. The foliage is narrow and fresh green. The quite large bell-shaped pale violet flowers are classic viorna type. 

Clematis socialis
A very rare plant from the Georgia and Alabama but hardy and easy to grow
£12


Arum

Arums obtained as concinnum Mt.Ida (bottom) and sp. Crete
 
A couple of interesting species from the garden here - neither of them correctly named when I got them and both a bit obscure. 

Arum concinnatum Mt.Ida
Arum sp. obtained as 'concinnum Mt.Ida' is probably a form of italicum (Mount Ida is in Crete - outside the distribution of italicum, so who knows?) It has large leaves with well defined pale markings and a scattering of black spots. The spathes seem to me to be unusually large - up to nearly 1ft tall, are pale and marked with maroon lines. A hardy and prolific plant.
£9


Arum aff.  concinnatum Crete
Arum sp. Crete - possibly a new species according to Peter Boyce. This is a smaller, less prolific plant than the above, with plain green leaves, cream spadices, and pale spathes, touched lightly with brown. Seems to be easy and adaptable.
£9



Aloe cooperi

Aloe cooperi

A fascinating species with fleshy upright foliage and striking orange inflorescences. This is one of the so-called grass Aloes (along with linearifolia and ecklonis) native to the Eastern Cape - these grow in grasslands and die down in winter to just a couple of central leaves. 

Aloe cooperi
Like many South African bulbs, they're cold hardy, but must have a dry winter, so only for the most sheltered spot outside - preferably with some sort of roof from November to March.
£12